IDEASSTORYTRAVEL

Great Blue

By Stewart Lawrence Strolling recently in Washington, DC’s, Rock Creek Park, I had a rare close encounter with one of the Park’s dwindling number of Great Blue Herons. While joggers streaked by, oblivious to its presence, and rush-hour traffic passed noisily overhead, I sat in wordless wonder as the Great Blue, clinging to a half-submerged log, slowly surveyed its domain, then gently peered into the water with its fierce yellow eyes and double-billed javelin beak. The Great Blue is less well ...
ART OF LIVINGFEATUREDTRAVEL

Taking the Waters at the Greenbrier

Editor’s note: Marsha B. Wassel visited the Greenbrier in West Virginia in May. She gives a review and some background on the curative waters of the area. by Marsha B. Wassel History of the Springs There is a history of seeking wellness high in West Virginia’s Allegheny Mountains, where mineral springs flow deep in the Earth, before breaking through the surface. The surrounding forests were home to Shawnee Indians who were the first to value the curative properties of the ...
READSTORY

Short Fiction: Unexpected Delays

By Taylor Hawkins Sarte Moore and his wife, Claudia, were closing in on their destination, a particular spot near a village on the Faroe Islands, a series of sea islands in the remote northwestern region of Denmark’s property. It was closer to Scotland than Denmark, but the landscape was unmistakably Nordic. The high-peaking cliffs, dusted with snow, covered the land mass in both the distance and their immediate surrounding area, creating an otherworldly contrast with vast ocean surrounding the islands. ...
IDEASREAD

Feel-good fractals: from ocean waves to Jackson Pollock’s art

By Florence Williams When Richard Taylor was 10 years old in the early 1970s in England, he chanced upon a catalogue of Jackson Pollock paintings. He was mesmerised, or perhaps a better word is Pollockised. Franz Mesmer, the crackpot 18th-century physician, posited the existence of animal magnetism between inanimate and animate objects. Pollock’s abstractions also seemed to elicit a certain mental state in the viewer. Now a physicist at the University of Oregon, Taylor thinks he has figured out what ...
ADRIA

Go: Editor’s Note Issue 2

By Adria Carey Perez Are there any paths not beaten? I tend to think of these paths as experiences that are unique–that you didn’t read about in the guidebook, and that usually involve a chance encounter with a person or a wrong turn on the way to the restaurant. You are more likely to have them in less “touristy” places; however, I have mistakenly discovered lesser known gems in Paris by wandering around looking for a metro stop. Tommy Alexander’s ...
ADRIAREADWhat I'm Reading

Go: What I’m Reading

By Adria Carey Perez Here’s my monthly round-up of links, books, articles, and other things I like that round out my ideas about the issue. If you like something, leave a comment. If you have something to recommend, contact me! I’m always looking for reading material. By subscribing to my newsletter, you will receive more of my favorites every month. Articles:   The women changing adventure travel   This is pretty cool!   One for the bucket list: A visit ...
FAMILYFEATUREDTRAVEL

Should I Take My Kids to a Developing Country?

By Adria Carey Perez Planning a summer vacation and asking, “Should I take my kids to a developing country?” The short answer is: yes, but… Last summer, we decided to go to Colombia. Not to a resort or with a tour group, but on a two-week, meandering road trip covering cities, beaches, and jungles. With our three kids, ages 4, 6, 9. Was it difficult? Yes. There were times during the trip when my husband and I looked at each ...
ABOUTADRIA

Sea: Editor’s Note Issue 1

The theme of the inaugural issue of Odyssa Magazine is “Sea,” chosen because any trip taken in, on, or near the water has the potential to be powerful. This month’s articles include some tips for family boating, why I love to travel to fishing villages in all of their incarnations, and a reflection on how we think about our human relationship to the world and the sea. Eating fish is also part of our relationship with the water, and where ...
TRAVEL

Nayarit, Mexico: El Panadero de Sayulita

El Panadero de Sayulita: A Musical Vignette from the Jungles of Nayarit, Mexico By Tommy Alexander The song brings me back to a rough coastal road near Sayulita, Mexico — barefoot and wild-haired, walking into town from the highway in the warm, fresh darkness. The way wound through lush tropical forest peppered with occasional shops and houses. As we strolled, we were lulled by the slow, gentle rhythm of crashing waves, only occasionally disturbed by the roar and rush of a passing ...
READSTORYTRAVEL

Short Fiction: Pamplona

Editor’s note: We continue our series of short fiction this month with a contribution about a desire to run with the bulls. The path is a bit beaten, but I’d class this as “adventure.” Pamplona By Kyle Owens Phillip poured himself a cup of coffee and went over to the other side of the room, sitting down on the window sill. He felt a light breeze flow through the opened casement windows as he sipped his coffee before he sat the ...