STORYTRAVEL

What Did I Sign Up For? (Raotang Boxing Club, Thailand)

By Bill Watts My eyes flickered open and I began to wonder, what time is it? Immediately, I remembered it didn’t matter. It’s Sunday. Today is a day for rest. Necessary, too–we had a hell of a night last night. I need more sleep. I rolled over and tightened my eyes, forcing my body to follow my mind into the void. As I began to lose consciousness, dull thuds and thwacks echoed in the distance. Ignore it, I told my ...
FEATUREDTRAVEL

Camaraderie On Wheels: Traveling with the Tucson Roller Derby

By Irene Jagla Not many Tucsonans willingly go to Phoenix, especially during the summer. The running joke is that Phoenix is nothing more than a giant parking lot in the desert. So when I found myself standing in a Phoenix parking lot on a sweltering July afternoon, enveloped in waves of heat emanating from the asphalt surface, I had to smile. I was watching the Copper Queens of Tucson Roller Derby do off-skate warm-ups before a bout with the Skate ...
FEATUREDSTORYTRAVEL

Algae Blooms in Nahant

By Madeline Gressman Nahant’s algae was rotting. The entire town reeked of sea decay, with countless fish and one seal washing ashore, dead. There wasn’t an escape from the odor; it seeped through our walls and weaved in with our clothes. Fans blasted at all hours, swirling the air in circles in a hope to dissipate the unholy smell. Today we were leaving the house for the first time since the algae bloomed. My mother, determined in her love of ...
FEATUREDTRAVEL

In Love with Cassis

By Marcia De Sanctis One of the great pleasures of writing a book about France is having the opportunity to give talks about some of my most beloved places. My audience is often a sea of erudite women assembled over petits-fours or roast lamb lunches. At the conclusion, the question always comes, inevitable as the sunrise: “But what is your very most, number one place in France?” My answer is always the same–the truth, but a non-committal one. “Any table ...
FEATUREDTRAVEL

A Stranger to Them (In Cambodia)

By Lana Orndorff New things are scary. Strangers can’t be trusted. Unknown places are dangerous. The echo of these ideas are my personal soundtrack as I search for plane tickets. I click the “confirm purchase” button anyway. The intense screaming of my wanderlust, which sounds similar to a small child that has dropped his pacifier, has managed to drown out the low hum of doubt. Fellow travelers know what I’m talking about. But, for those close to me who don’t ...
IDEAS

The Struggle of Women in Science is Written in the ...

Editor’s note: Finishing up a summer in which a total solar eclipse was a highlight, I was struck by how many people trekked across the United Stated and camped out under the stars to witness the fleeting moment of darkness and silence of this celestial event. I was dumbstruck when I read Leila A. McNeill’s piece about how women fit into the history of the heavens. By Leila A. McNeill In her 1968 poem, Planetarium, the poet Adrienne Rich wrestles with ...
ADRIA

WELL: Editor’s Note Issue 3

Our summer issue, WELL, is predicated on the idea that the summer is a time to recharge. We take vacations, we spend time outdoors and with our families. We focus on “happy.” When I think of well being, I tend to think of it as a holistic system: personal health is inextricably intertwined with mental health, community health, and the health of the planet. I love to read stories, articles, blogs, and books that plumb the depths of these connections. ...
IDEASSTORYTRAVEL

Great Blue

By Stewart Lawrence Strolling recently in Washington, DC’s, Rock Creek Park, I had a rare close encounter with one of the Park’s dwindling number of Great Blue Herons. While joggers streaked by, oblivious to its presence, and rush-hour traffic passed noisily overhead, I sat in wordless wonder as the Great Blue, clinging to a half-submerged log, slowly surveyed its domain, then gently peered into the water with its fierce yellow eyes and double-billed javelin beak. The Great Blue is less well ...
ART OF LIVINGFEATUREDTRAVEL

Taking the Waters at the Greenbrier

Editor’s note: Marsha B. Wassel visited the Greenbrier in West Virginia in May. She gives a review and some background on the curative waters of the area. by Marsha B. Wassel History of the Springs There is a history of seeking wellness high in West Virginia’s Allegheny Mountains, where mineral springs flow deep in the Earth, before breaking through the surface. The surrounding forests were home to Shawnee Indians who were the first to value the curative properties of the ...
READSTORY

Short Fiction: Unexpected Delays

By Taylor Hawkins Sarte Moore and his wife, Claudia, were closing in on their destination, a particular spot near a village on the Faroe Islands, a series of sea islands in the remote northwestern region of Denmark’s property. It was closer to Scotland than Denmark, but the landscape was unmistakably Nordic. The high-peaking cliffs, dusted with snow, covered the land mass in both the distance and their immediate surrounding area, creating an otherworldly contrast with vast ocean surrounding the islands. ...